2018 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Note: The following is the schedule of events for the 2018 NEXT conference.

 

Hosted in San Francisco, a city recognized as a leading hub for innovative design leaders and thinkers, AIASF NEXT is a great opportunity to hone your cutting-edge ideas, projects, and practices that will impact the next generation of the architecture and design profession as well as the future of the built environment.

 

From Thursday's Opening Night Party at the California College of the Arts (CCA) to a full-day of educational programming and networking opportunities on Friday at the San Francisco Art Institute, AIASF NEXT/New Urban Agenda will offer 12 inspirational and informative sessions on what's NEXT in the built environment led by more than 50 of the nation's leading experts in design, business, and technology.

THURSDAY, MAY 31

Day 1: Pre-Conference Symposium

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 

1111 EIGHTH STREET

This year’s Housing Symposium will examine the housing crisis as it relates to three basic principles: public needs and desires, policy rules and incentives, and professional responses to these forces. Alternatives beyond what is currently thought possible will also be part of the discussion given the existing conditions of public pressures and policy structure.

11:00 AM

REGISTRATION OPENS / LUNCH / NETWORKING

NOON

WELCOME / SYMPOSIUM KEYNOTE

MICHAEL PYATOK, FAIA, PRINCIPAL, PYATOK ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN

Michael Pyatok has been an architect and professor of architectural design for 50 years. Since opening his office in 1984 in Oakland, California, he has designed over 40,000 units of housing for lower-income households, students, seniors and market rate renters and owners, in the US and abroad. He has developed participatory design methods to facilitate the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders in the process, helping many lower income communities plan and execute new housing, neighborhood plans and community facilities. A graduate of Pratt Institute and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, he was also a Fulbright Scholar in Helsinki Finland as a young professor where he researched the housing strategies of Finland. In his mid-career he returned to Harvard as a Loeb Fellow where he researched strategies for non-profit housing developers in this age of shrinking government involvement. 

12:30 - 1:15 PM

PANEL DISCUSSION: PUBLIC ADVOCACY

(MODERATOR) MIMI SULLIVAN, AIA, PRINCIPAL, SAIDA + SULLIVAN DESIGN PARTNERS

TODD DAVID, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SAN FRANCISCO HOUSING ACTION COALITION (SFHAC)

SAM MOSS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MISSION HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

DEBRA SANDERSON, PLANNING MANAGER, CITY OF BERKELEY

RUTH TODD, FAIA, LEED AP, AICP, PRINCIPAL, PAGE & TURNBULL

1:15 - 1:30 PM

NETWORKING BREAK

1:30 - 2:30 PM

PANEL DISCUSSION: POLITICAL ACTION

(MODERATOR) NEAL SCHWARTZ, AIA,  PRINCIPAL, SCHWARTZ + ARCHITECTURE

DANIEL ADAMS, DEPUTY DIRECTOR - HOUSING, SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR'S OFFICE OF HOUSING + COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (MOHCD)

MARK MACY, PRINCIPAL, MACY ARCHITECTURE

MAIA SMALL, URBAN DESIGNER / ARCHITECT, SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT

KRISTY WANG, COMMUNITY PLANNING POLICY DIRECTOR, SPUR

NETWORKING BREAK

3:00 - 4:15 PM

PANEL DISCUSSION: PROFESSIONAL SYNTHESIS

(MODERATOR) SARAH WILLMER, OWNER, STUDIO SARAH WILLMER ARCHITECTURE

PATRICK KENNEDY, OWNER, PANORAMIC INTERESTS

RIKI NISHIMURA, AIA, RIBA, MRAIC, LEED AP BD+C,  DIRECTOR OF URBAN STRATEGIES, GENSLER

CYNTHIA A. PARKER, PRESIDENT & CEO, BRIDGE HOUSING

ANNE TORNEY, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, PARTNER, MITHUN

4:15 - 4:45 PM

CLOSING REMARKS

JOHN RAHAIM, PLANNING DIRECTOR, CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO

John was appointed Planning Director for the City and County of San Francisco in January 2008.   In that role he is responsible for overseeing long range planning, environmental reviews, and development entitlements for most physical development in the City. Prior to his appointment in San Francisco, he was Director of Long Range Planning for the City of Seattle, and was the Founding Executive Director of City Design, Seattle’s office of Urban Design. John received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of Michigan, and a Master of Architecture from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. During his tenure, the Planning Department has completed detailed plans for approximately 20% of the city, where most of the city’s growth will occur.

 

2:30 - 3:00 PM

5:00 - 8:00 PM

NEXT / NEW URBAN AGENDA  - RECEPTION

FRIDAY, JUNE 1

Day 2: NEXT Conference Sessions

SAN FRANCISCO ART INSTITUTE 

800 CHESTNUT STREET

8:00 - 9:00 AM

NEXT / NEW URBAN AGENDA 

BREAKFAST RECEPTION

9:00 - 10:00 AM

OPENING GENERAL SESSION

ROSA SHENG, FAIA, AIASF BOARD PRESIDENT; DIRECTOR & PRINCIPAL OF EQUITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSION, SMITHGROUPJJR

STAN LEW, AIA, LEED AP. PRINCIPAL, RMW ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS

JENNIFER JONES, MS, CAE, IOM, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AIASF

 

Michael Pyatok has been an architect and professor of architectural design for 50 years. Since opening his office in 1984 in Oakland, California, he has designed over 40,000 units of housing for lower-income households, students, seniors and market rate renters and owners, in the US and abroad. He has developed participatory design methods to facilitate the involvement of a wide range of

NEXT/ NEW URBAN AGENDA CONFERENCE KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

(KEYNOTE ADDRESS) CHARISMA ACEY, PH.D., PROFESSOR OF CITY & REGIONAL PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Charisma's research in the U.S. focuses on healthy food access and equitable development, while ongoing projects in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda investigate ways to improve household access to clean water, safe sanitation, alternative energy solutions, and approaches to public participation using geographic information systems (GIS). She has over 18 years of experience working with communities, local governments, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions on international development, humanitarian relief, poverty reduction and infrastructure planning.

PATRICK OTELLINI, PROJECT MANAGER/OCEANWIDE CENTER DEVELOPMENT, SWINERTON BUILDERS

Patrick was the 2016 recipient of the Exemplary Practice in Earthquake Risk Reduction from the Northern California Chapter of EERI for his work in developing seismic retrofit and evaluation ordinances as the Director of Earthquake Safety and the first Chief Resilience Officer for the City and County of San Francisco, prior to his move to Swinerton in 2017. He is a Certified Building Inspector through the International Code Council and a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association. Patrick currently lives in San Francisco with his wife and two children and remains active in San Francisco’s earthquake safety efforts.

HOLLY PEARSON, AICP, SENIOR PLANNER, MICHAEL BAKER INTERNATIONAL

Holly serves as the Sustainability Director with the American Planning Association’s California Chapter – Northern Section.  She holds a master's degree in Planning and a professional certificate in International Development from the University of British Columbia. Holly is an urban planner specializing in local strategies to promote sustainability, with an interest in cities in the U.S. as well as in the global south. She has 12 years of experience working in urban and community planning with local governments and NGOs in the United States, Canada and Latin America. Holly has worked for the City of Vancouver, British Columbia on both land use planning and the creation of a city-wide plan for social development. In 2005 she was awarded a grant to work for six months with

Fundación Biosfera, an environmental organization in Argentina, on the development of a municipal climate action program in the city of La Plata. At home in the Bay Area she has worked as a planner for the Cities of Oakland and San Francisco. She also worked with the Oakland-based non-profit organization Ecocity Builders managing grassroots sustainable cities projects in Latin America.

 

10:00 - 10:30 AM

MORNING NETWORKING BREAK

10:30 - NOON

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BUSINESS / 1.5 LUs

Big Room vs. Living Room: Does Physical Presence Matter?

 

June A. Grant, CA, NOMA

Design Principal, blink!Lab

Danielle Wyss, AIA, BA Arch, MSM

President, The Shift Group

TECHNOLOGY TRACK / 1.5 LUs

A Renewable Future: Designing for Grid Harmonization

Anthony Kingman

Senior Project Manager, Jacobs Engineering Group

Claire Maxfield 

Director, Atelier Ten 

Ted Tiffany, LEED BD+C

Director of Sustainability, Guttman& Blaevooet Consulting Engineers

DESIGN TRACK / 1.5 LUs

An Architecture of Social Justice

 

Susie Coliver

Principal, Herman Coliver Locus Architecture

Karoleen Feng,

Director of Community Real Estate, Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA)

Ryan Jang, AIA, LEED AP

Associate Principal, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects

Anne Torney, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Partner, Mithun

NOON - 1:15 PM

LUNCH

LUNCH

1:30 - 2:30 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BUSINESS TRACK / 1 LU

SF Firms and the 2030 Commitment: How Are We Doing?

 

Gwen Fuertes, LEED AP BD+C

Assoc. AIA, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects


Brad Jacobson, AIA, LEED AP

Associate Principal, EHDD

Dan Johnson

Sustainability Architect, Beyond Efficiency

TECHNOLOGY TRACK / 1 LU

Future Mobility: Transforming Future Development?

 

William Baumgardner, PE

Principal, ARUP

Elaine BreezeVice President, Development, SummerHill Apartment Communities


William Riggs, Ph.D., AICP, LEED AP

Professor, USF

DESIGN TRACK /1 LU

Resiliency Pioneers: Applying Best Practices from SF & Beyond!

Arathi Gowda, AIA, AICP, LEED AP BD+C

Associate Director, SOM

Emelie Hagen, LEED Fellow

Associate Director, Atelier Ten

Francesca Oliveira, AIA, LEED BD+C, NCARB

Associate Technical Design, SOM

2:30 - 2:45 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

SESSION CHANGE

DESIGN TRACK /1 LU

New Direction of Urban Demographics and Infrastructure

Thomas Brutting, FAIA

Principal, HKIT Architects

Megan Dale

Landscape Architect, Senior Associate, RHAA

Leah Marthinsen,

RA (California), LEED AP BD&C

Architect, Burks Toma Architects

TECHNOLOGY TRACK / 1 LU

Water Balance in a Changing Climate


Josiah Cain, ASLA, Director of Innovation,

Sherwood Design Engineers

Zoe McBride, LEED AP BD+C, EIT,

Project Consultant, Thornton Tomasetti

Mark Meredith

Product Manager & National Sales Manager, Phoenix Process Equipment Co.

Lynn Simon, FAIA, LEED Fellow

Senior Vice President, Thornton Tomasetti 

BUSINESS TRACK / 1 LU

A Sustainable and Equitable Solution for Nonprofits

Leiasa Beckham, LEED AP

Principal, Common Ground Urban Development

Adhamina Rodriguez

Founder, AR Green Consulting

2:45 - 3:45 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

3:45- 4:15 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

AFTERNOON NETWORKING BREAK

4:15 - 5:15 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BUSINESS TRACK / 1 LU

Mixed-Use Success: 
Winning Design, Finance & Leasing Strategies 

 

David Dologite, Sr.

Housing Finance Consultant & Policy Counsel, California Housing  Partnership

Carolyn Johnson

Associate Director, Commercial Real Estate/East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation

Caroline Souza, AIA, LEED AP

Associate, David Baker Architects

TECHNOLOGY TRACK / 1 LU

Taming Technology's Dragons to Engage Stakeholders As Project Collaborators 

Cesar Escalante

Design & Technology Manager, HOK

Peter Swearengen

Director of Product Strategy, Orignate 

Barbara Tien

CEO/Founder, Ponga

Alberto Tono

Research + Development Intern, HOK

DESIGN TRACK /1 LU

Designing for Equity: SF Bayview Parks Plan

Marsha (Pendergrass) Maloof

Managing Partner, Pendergrass Smith Consulting / President Bayview Neighborhood Association Pendergrass Smith Consulting,

Mohammed Nuru

Director, San Francisco Public Works

Rae Smith, Registered Architect, AICP, LEED AP

Senior Urban Designer/Planner, HOK

Roana Tirado

Senior Landscape Designer, HOK

5:30 - 8:30 PM

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

CLOSING RECEPTION

Session Descriptions 

BUSINESS TRACK

Big Room vs. Living RoomThe trend to an ever decreasing footprint has no better example than WeWork's dominance of the model. Gigantic firms such as AECOM require a global network of trust. Digital tools and server farms in remote locations mean we have migrated from paper and footprint to bits, bytes, mobility and oddly ever increasing screen sizes. Have we come any closer to a virtual design team that never meets face-to-face? What is the impact of the trend to freelancing in opposition to the traditional employer-employee work model? Does the client care that the project team is not co-located? What does it take to work with-in the virtual team network? What are the gains? How can we exploit the virtual realm to better manage our cities and deliver greater service to our residents? 

SF Firms and the 2030 Commitment: How Are We Doing?This session brings together a discussion among Bay Area sustainability leaders and architects that have signed on to the AIA 2030 Commitment to explore how we are doing and how we are doing it. The speakers will share how the AIA 2030 Commitment has influenced and added value to their practice, culture, and work. Case studies of local projects that have met the 2030 Commitment will be presented, as well as lessons learned from integrating the metrics into practice. Firms that have met the annual target practice-wide will offer insight into how they are achieving high performance across their portfolio and how they intend to ratchet up towards firm-wide net zero performance by 2030. Additionally, the panel will share an aggregated summary of AIA 2030 Commitment reported data as volunteered by local firms that huddle quarterly on this topic. The results of this data gathering will be shared and report where Bay Area firms stand in relation to our peers across the country. We will seek to draw out patterns of what has been working and where we have room to improve as a community of designers. 

 

A Sustainable and Equitable Solution for Nonprofits: If cities had enough philanthropic landlords, nonprofit organizations would never face eviction in the uprising rental market. But unfortunately, that is not the case, so we need to find innovative solutions in the pursuit of equity and social justice in the urban development agenda. This session introduces bold ideas to permanently house social service nonprofits in the San Francisco volatile real estate market. The developer, Common Ground Urban Development (CGUD), will describe best practices in nonprofit facility development including: early site control, equitable financing structure, and shared management. AR Green Consulting (AR Green) will illustrate how CGUD’s innovative business solution will materialize into a green building, seeking a minimum of LEEDv4 Gold certification, that will be 100 percent occupied by 10 nonprofits offering job training, housing placement, addiction counseling, and adult education. Not every day we find a project that is both sustainable as well equitable. The featured case study, 1850 Bryant, is a $120 million, 200,000-square-foot commercial condominium complex. 1850 Bryant was unanimously approved by the SF Planning Commission in June 2017 bringing good news to the gentrifying Mission District.

Mixed-Use Success: Winning Design, Finance & Leasing StrategiesAs standard brick-and-mortar retail declines and dining out increases, designers need new strategies for affordable tenant spaces that foster vibrant local retail and food culture, yet are flexible enough to weather future changes in our cities. Subject matter experts in the areas of design, construction, financing, marketing and leasing of commercial space in affordable housing developments will share successful (and not) real-world examples that illuminate the key challenges of developing these kinds of projects. The panel will offer strategies for creating the high-performing commercial space that supports the vibrant and sustainable life of our cities. 

TECHNOLOGY TRACK

A Renewable Future: Designing for Grid Harmonization: With emerging standards requiring different forms of Zero Net Energy and ambitious owners developing ZNE buildings, it has become imperative to recognize the potential impacts net metered buildings can have on the historic grid structure and operations. Understanding the future of energy and renewable energy implementation and distribution is critical as our buildings and overall built environment become more technically advanced. This presentation will explore the challenges encountered in the design and implementation of zero net energy buildings and how they impact the larger grid. Additionally, the session will examine the issues facing the California Grid system and discuss strategies including advanced building design, leveraging district scale resource efficiencies, renewable energy systems, micro-grids, and other solutions for grid harmonization.

Future Mobility: Transforming Future Development?: Rapidly emerging mobility trends such as autonomous vehicles, mobility services, electrification, data driven solutions, analytics, and smart infrastructure have potential to transform urban mobility. Ubiquitous on-demand, shared electric vehicles could radically change how we travel and our perception of car ownership, and by extension, how we plan, design and regulate development projects. This session will explore the implications from the Planner, Developer and Designer perspectives and draw on recent real-world experience to cut through the hype and provide practical guidance on how conditions are likely to change for travel demand, entitlement, parking supply site and building design.
 

Water Balance in a Changing ClimateIn this changing climate, water is increasingly scarce with every passing year and therefore more critical for the building industry to address when designing and operating buildings. This session aims to encourage project teams to look more closely at water reuse strategies, recognizing that water balance is the first step to more informed decision-making. Additionally, an overview of how water reuse affects the urban agenda will be explored as well as technologies and tools that can frame the way we think about water as a resource in our cities today. While water reuse is often the most comprehensive conservation measure available to project teams, data around reuse strategies is often fragmented and underdeveloped. The Water Balance Calculator (WBC) is an innovative new tool which supports the integrated design process that enables developers and architects to weigh the benefits and trade-offs of different approaches to water as a resource in building design, thereby affecting regional water sources. These steps can also point designers toward certain water reuse solutions, such as graywater or blackwater treatment. Since abnormal dryness or drought is affecting about 75% of our state’s population, it is imperative that the building industry tackle this problem in order to mitigate and conserve our water resources as well as to design for resiliency going forward. 

Taming Technology's Dragons to Engage Stakeholders As Project CollaboratorsToday’s near-instant access to information has fundamentally changed stakeholders' expectations for involvement in decisions affecting their urban environment. In the past, they would rely on experts to assess the impact of change and lead them to a new course of action. A new model is evolving where stakeholders have access to deeply detailed information and expect to participate in driving a new course of action. Technologies are within reach to help communities articulate requirements that might otherwise be invisible to designers including local attributes, cultural legacies, and historical sensitivities. The challenge of evolving tools, however, isn’t technical, it’s one of engagement. This panel embraces this paradigm shift and will focus the discussion on how to leverage technology to engage a range of stakeholders. This panel includes technologists and designers who will discuss how project planning practices can thoughtfully leverage appropriate technologies to engage stakeholders in a productive dialogue.  At one end, is the design and technology manager at HOK discussing how they used AR/VR to engage 200+ stakeholders in the planning stages in the design of the new the Salt Lake City International Airport in Utah. At the other end, are the technology and communications members of the HASSELL+ team of the Resilient Bay competition discussing their approach to engaging community members in the South City project using a range of tools from social media to shopfronts. 

DESIGN TRACK

An Architecture of Social Justice: A wide variety of backgrounds are a sign of health; affordable housing is essential for nourishing this diversity. Our current economic boom highlights economic disparity as one of the greatest challenges of our time. The equity nourished by affordable housing is as necessary to cities as streets and sewers. What does an architecture of social justice look like in San Francisco's Mission District and elsewhere? Historically home to an immigrant Latino community, the Mission is loved for its vibrant cultural community. This dynamism has made it attractive to new residents. Now one of the most unaffordable neighborhoods in the country, a median-income Latino family needs to pay 97% of their income on housing, resulting in <25% of residents displaced since 2000. Through the lens of affordable housing, this session will explore the New Urban Agenda goals in the context of this vibrant neighborhood 

Resiliency Pioneers: Applying Best Practices from SF & Beyond! Globally we face 6°C of warming, or more, if we don't achieve an emissions peak by 2020. Architects and Planners will play a vital role in leading the massive intervention required for successful and immediate decarbonization. The session will discussion methods of pioneering Resilient Design Principles to enact rapid Carbon Drawdown at all scales. Understand accelerating trends, locally and internationally, that are driving change in rapidly developing Urban markets, such as San Francisco. Learn how Municipalities are addressing the requirements for Climate Action Plans and developing policy armatures that encourage sustainable building design and apply these best practices to your next building.

New Direction of Urban Demographics and Infrastructure: With increasing growth and demographic shifts, cities face an increasing pressure on all their resources—both spatial and social. Demographic changes and corresponding growth in utility infrastructure require a more strategically integrated approach to urban environments. While functional requirements for different populations and infrastructural spaces can make integrated design challenging, new models of development offer opportunities for multi-use spaces within many projects. This session will focus on the growing aging population in urban areas and the parallel evolution of utility infrastructure to provide public amenities for residents of all ages.

Designing for Equity: SF Bayview Parks PlanMarginalized neighborhoods in San Francisco, which desperately need the access to nature, healthy foods, and safe public spaces, have access to less than a tenth of this land. This panel will encourage participants to seek their own creative public / private partnerships, unique infrastructural solutions and participatory engagement processes within their communities. It will challenge the thinking that open space development is expensive and requires large areas of land and improve the Planning and Landscape practice with its pro bono application and inspirational message. By exploring the possibilities of forgotten pieces of land, the team was able to revitalize and create new community hearts and gathering spaces in areas where there were none, empowering and improving the sustainability, equity and resilience in our urban built environment.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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